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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little bit slow. we had this conversation 10 years ago. now, i will stick my neck out and say for a variety of reasons, some of which are circumstantial, some of which have to do with the leadership in the standing committee come i believe that this topic will have to become an a more important topic. and that wi
suppression. our next guest defense the tough voter id law say it is a paramount important that we protect the integrity of the process and make sure voter irregularities and voter fraud is eliminating. joining us now, attorney general of south carolina, great to have you with us.at first, your reaction to what the first lady had to sy. >> i obviously disagree with the first lady.with in every state i looked at, georgia, indiana are two states, section five, one is not a section five states. when they have had laws with a federal id for theoter registration card actually minority that is a went up in subsequent elections and participation.s. lou: when you talk about the five states, those are states because of civil rights transgressions 60 years ago, 50 years ago, they still remain under the watchful eye of the justice department for a revision in their electoral laws or procedures, right?pro >> absolutely. states have asked the federal government permission before they can implement a law thathe affects elections, but in a state passing a law, that she, went up in a state of georgia, up
morality. legislation works on the sane, legislation works on the law abiding. it doesn't work on criminals -- >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're up for trying it? >> there are monsters out there every day and we need to do something to stop them. >> if it's possible to reduce the loss of life, you're worth trying it, correct? >> if it's possible to reduce -- >> that's what you said. >> i want it. that's what i'm proposing. >> let's stipulate you're right. let's say armed guards might work. let's widen the argument a little bit. here is a magazine for ammunition that carries 30 bullets. isn't it possible that if we got rid of these, if we replaced them and said can you only have a magazine that carries five bullets or ten bullets, isn't it just possible we could reduce the carnage in a situation like -- >> i don't believe that's going to make one difference. there are so many ways to evade that. even if you had that. you had that for ten years when dianne feinstein passed that ban in '94, it was on the books. columbine occurred right in the middle of it. it didn't make a
as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that , you have a certain risk factor. was it reall
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
lawmakers seemed close to becoming law until jeanne boehner walked away from the deal and tried to yankee laterally pass his own bill which he called, somewhat weirdly, plan b, to raise taxes on over 100 million and suspend all leeming cuts. that plan blew up in boehner's face, however, when he couldn't get enough votes from his own caucus to pass it. here's boehner, the day after pulling the bill from the floor. >> because of the political divide in the country, because of the divide here in washington, trying to bridge these differences has been difficult. while we may have not been able to get the votes last night, to avert 99.81% of the tax increases, i don't think -- they weren't taking that out on me. they were dealing with the perception that somebody might accuse them of raising taxes. >> probably because he's asking them to vote for raising taxes. later on friday, president obama reiterated he wants to reach a broad compromise to cut the deficit so social security cuts remain on the table but in the mean time, the president proposed his own plan b, to extend the bush tax cuts on
to work at the state level. we saw last week the state of michigan adopted a new law that gave workers the freedom not to join a union. now, they didn't do that because it was politically expedient or that they thought it was a good idea, because it actually is probably going to get a lot of the politicians in hot water in michigan. but what they did is looked at 23 other states who had adopted the same idea and saw that they were attracting businesses and creating jobs, and these states without raising taxes had more revenue to build schools and roads and hospitals. it was just an idea that worked. it's not a political idea to give people the freedom not to join a union, it's an american idea and it's an idea that works. we can look around the country today and again, we make these things political and give them labels that are good or bad, depending on, i guess, which party you're in. but we know a number of states have been real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced
said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion
association any attempt to time the gun laws, to do what even the international association of police chiefs says is a good idea, to ban these military-style assault weapons? will you oppose that? will you continue to oppose that? >> we will continue to oppose a ban on semiautomatic weapons that are used for perfectly legitimate purposes. these aren't military weapons. if we equipped our army with the ar-15 we'd be beaten by every third world-- you know, every third world dictatorship in the country. military weapons fully automatic weapons and that's illegal. you don't get those. that's not what we're talking about. the impression often is, bob, that is what we're talking about, but it isn't. we're talking about sporting arms-- you know the ar-15 is the highest selling-- >> schieffer: how many rounds can these weapons discharge, say, in five seconds? >> well, they fire when you put trigger. >> schieffer: sure and they keep firing. >> just as your shotgun-- not your shotgun bout most shotguns do. >> they don't keep firing. that's a fully automatic weapon. these are not fully automatic weapon
that the affordable care act will begin to become fully finalized to law over the next couple of years. we keep hearing those on the conservative side or republicans raise concerns about what we'll do for the country. what is your view. now you're not part profit excess. you can speak more freely. is it going to be a good thing for the country? >> yes, it will. for one reason, as an example, right now we have 50 some billion dollars a year of uncompensated care. that means people don't have insurance don't have medicaid, medicare or private insurance, don't have military coverage or anything like that, so they are not insured. they have access to health care in the emergency rooms. if they taken in and can't pay and don't go through a bankruptcy or something like that, that costs that care doesn't just go away. it's shifted over to the rest of the us who have insurance. that's $50 billion. now, you stop and think about that it could be as much as $1500 per person who pay for those who don't. when you have everybody in the system, all insured one way or another, that uncompensated care goes away
are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a decade before two decades before your something like 1500 african-americans serving across the country at various levels is local, state and federal offices. 14 congressmen, two senators, lieutenant governors. it's really powerful. for the kenai tremendous opportunity and promise in the future and so much changes so quickly. it makes me think about her own moment and wonder how fragile is progress. >> when i was at the newberry, i was looking for michelle obama's ancestors. one other thing as kerry says whether i could find out who is the first person in the family to vote. it was a hopeless quest. but i was in the newberry library, a lovely library in chicago and i stumbled across a book that had voter registrations from the 1860s from north carolina. and i look do not book and no jumpers. and i thought it my father, he's from north carolina. otherwise, my great great great grandfather, who in 1867 40 years old, two years free registered to vote. he was approved as a voter.
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
to the health care law is of course a tea party favorite and a favorite of social conservatives, but money and the backing of the clintons didn't do the trick for mccullough last time around. key question this time, which flawed candidate wins this race or supposedly flawed candidate? mccullough is hoping to break this curse. since 1976, the party that wins the presidency loses the state's gubernatorial election the next year. it's never wavered. 20 2001, after bush was elected, mark warner, he defeated a republican. 52% of the vote. in 2005, after bush's election, tim kaine beat jerry kilgore by six points. bob mcdonnell won in obama's first year in office. it would turn out to be 40%. the electorate likely to be a little whiter, older, more conservative than it was in virginia. will it be conservative enough to elect ken kutch anele. speaking of the campaign, if you're thinking of working on hillary's presidential campaign, you're supposed to send your resumf to terry mccullough. in new jersey, where the governor's race is all about one man, chris christie and 2016. he hopes to scare off
in afghanistan that works on police training for the afghan forces. he worked in law enforcement and was a u.s. military veteran. suzanne. >> all right. condolences to his family. thank you, barbara. appreciate it. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to
for law enforcement. gregg: and trace is next with the remarble story of a little boy who touched lots of hearts after the connecticut school shooting. >> when i heard about sandy hook, i just felt really bad for all the kids who had died. >> i wasn't surprised that he wanted to do something, i was just surprised that he followed through with it, and it made me really proud. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood suga
the president needs to do. there is nothing he has to sign. as a matter of law the law changes in january and taxes go up. president doesn't have to do anything. he can sit back and as taxes go up on everybody including that 1% that he has been after, nothing has been done on spending. sequestration could be rolled back with retro activity where the president thinks he is better shape on spending in january. patti ann: alan? >> you forget the president offered boehner a deal to keep taxes keep the bush tax rate on 98% of the americans. keep those tax rates where they are. not raise taxes and boehner rejected that. he had opportunity -- excuse me, i'm still talking. he has opportunity now to do exactly what the republicans say they want and boehner rejects it. >> it is beyond revenue. it is about spending. that is our problem. >> you can stop going over cliff first of the year. >> what about spending that got us in bind we're in? none of the revenue that will be generated will make a dent in our spending especially the 6 trillion the president has --. patti ann: brad, democrats are arguing
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)